By June 28, 2012 Read More →

2013 BMW M6 Coupe

Wide air intakes, stunningly contoured headlight units and large, smooth surfaces shape the front end of the new BMW M6 Coupe. Another eye-catching element of the car’s nose is its newly designed M kidney grille, which bears an “M6” badge. The 30-millimetre increase in track width over the two cars’ respective 6 Series stablemates is complemented by powerfully flared front wheel arches, which sit flush with the wheels. The new BMW M6 Coupe is fitted with 19-inch M light-alloy wheels as standard. The forged wheels feature seven double-spokes in a two-tone finish. The optional 20-inch M light-alloy wheels, meanwhile, hint at reduced weight with their five intricate double spokes and allow a clear line of sight through to the powerful braking system. Like its predecessor, the roof of the new BMW M6 Coupe is made from carbon fibre-reinforced plastic as standard. The dark colouring of the roof gives the two-door car’s silhouette an extremely elongated look, which is further emphasised by a dynamic recess in the centre of the roof. The use of the lightweight material for the roof allows the car’s centre of gravity to be lowered, enhancing agility.

BMW M6 is powered by a high-revving V8 engine with M TwinPower Turbo technology. The 4.4-litre powerplant produces 560 horsepower between 6000 and 7200rpm. The peak torque of 680 Newton metres is available between 1500 and 5750rpm. This instantaneous and sustained power delivery is the key to unlocking the cars’ intoxicating acceleration. The new BMW M6 Coupe dashes from rest to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.2 seconds. The top speed is electronically limited to 250 km/h (155 mph). Specifying the optional M Driver’s Package raises this barrier to 305 km/h (189 mph). The high operating effectiveness of the engine, the standard-fitted Auto Start-Stop function and other examples of Efficient Dynamics technology, such as Brake Energy Regeneration and the volume-controlled oil pump, help to reduce fuel consumption and emissions by some 30 per cent. The new BMW M6 Coupe cards average fuel consumption of 9.9 litres per 100 kilometres (28.5 mpg imp) in the EU test cycle and CO2 emissions of 232 grams per kilometre.

Tuned seamlessly to the performance characteristics of the V8 engine, the M Double Clutch Transmission with Drivelogic converts the powerplant’s impressive thrust extremely effectively into rapid acceleration. This capability is underpinned by the DCT design principle, which effectively combines two gearboxes in one housing – yet with virtually no size or weight penalty over a conventional manual transmission. Inside the transmission, the torque is transferred via two oil-cooled wet clutches, which are engaged alternately. This allows zero interruption in the flow of power when the driver accelerates, even during gear changes. M DCT Drivelogic offers the driver three different shift programs, both in automated mode (D) and in manual mode (S). These programs alter the transmission’s shift characteristics in terms of efficiency, shift comfort and sportiness and can be activated using the rocker switch located behind the selector lever on the centre console. Added to which, the electronics also provide a Launch Control function ensuring unbeatable acceleration from a standing start, Low Speed Assistance for easier low-speed operation, and the Auto Start-Stop function for increased efficiency.

The chassis of the new BMW M6 Coupe has been developed to M specification and therefore combines performance attributes with the comfort-enhancing features drivers appreciate on an everyday basis. Like the integral rear axle, whose subframes are bolted rigidly to the body, the double-wishbone front axle boasts specific kinematics and newly developed components made from forged aluminium. Chassis mountings using large panels at the front and rear axle ensure dynamic forces are passed evenly through to the body, making for highly precise wheel control. The standard equipment includes electronically controlled dampers. The M-specific Dynamic Damper Control system adjusts damping force electrohydraulically to provide the required responses for the driving situation at hand and fulfil the wishes of the driver. A choice of three settings allows drivers to adjust the damper characteristics to their needs and preferences

The new BMW M6 offers optimum traction in tricky road and weather conditions and under dynamic acceleration out of corners. Working behind the scenes to this end is an innovative variable locking differential in the rear differential. The Active M Differential allows the engine’s power to be split precisely and quickly between the left and right rear wheel according to the requirements of the driving situation at any particular moment. An electronically controlled multi-plate limited-slip differential helps to reduce the rotational speed differences between the rear wheels, which is needed to optimise traction. The Active M Differential control unit is linked up to the DSC stability control system, allowing every driving situation to be precisely analysed and a loss of traction at one wheel to be detected at an early stage. The locking effect generated in response can be varied between 0 and 100 per cent, enabling wheel spin to be prevented on slippery surfaces, in instances where the left and right rear wheel have widely differing friction coefficients, in tight bends and when changing direction extremely dynamically.

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