Classic Race Cars

BMW 328 Touring Coupe (1939)
By April 4, 2013 Read More →

BMW 328 Touring Coupe (1939)

In 1938 BMW’s rivals had achieved good results in using lightweight, streamlined bodies in small-engined cars in races in the Le Mans and Mille Miglia. Open-top cars had been shown to be less aerodynamically efficient than hardtops, and BMW wasn’t about to argue. In 1938 the decision was taken to build a hardtop racing saloon based on the BMW 328 Roadster.

Ferrari 512 S (1970)
By January 29, 2013 Read More →

Ferrari 512 S (1970)

To challenge the Porsches, mainly 917, in the 1970 World Sportscar Championship, Ferrari created the 512 S race car. The new racer was developed relatively quickly by a team headed by Mauro Forghieri. As the car’s name would suggest, the Ferrari 512 S was powered by an all-alloy, 5-litre V12-engine. With twin overhead camshafts per bank and four valves per cylinder the engine delivered 550 horsepower at 8500 rpm.

Porsche 908 Coupe (1968)
By January 7, 2013 Read More →

Porsche 908 Coupe (1968)

After FIA reduced the engine capacity limit to 3 litres for prototypes in the World Constructors’ Championships at the end of 1967, Porsche designed the 908 sports car to have an even footing with its rivals in the competition for the title. Porsche 908 was the first Porsche sports car to have an engine with the maximum size allowed by the rules. Its new 3-litre engine was tailor-made to the large capacity class for the first time in the long motorsport history of Porsche.

Ford GT40 (1964-1969)
By September 21, 2012 Read More →

Ford GT40 (1964-1969)

In the 1960s Henry Ford II wanted to bring the Ford Motor Company back to the racing circuits. One of the main goals was to win the 24h Le Mans. The endurance race, that Ferrari was dominating at the time. To compete seriously at Le Mans, Ford needed a 200-mph mid-engined car that could maintain a 120-mph average lap speed after 24 hours, and Ford needed the car quickly

Mercedes-Benz 190 SL racing version (1955)
By August 29, 2012 Read More →

Mercedes-Benz 190 SL racing version (1955)

The first sales brochures of the Mercedes-Benz 190 SL included also photos of a racing version of the car. The racing version’s doors were made of light alloy and a small racing-car windshield was made of Perspex. The omission of soft-top, bumpers, heat exchanger and insulating material reduced the car’s weight to some 1,000 kilograms, roughly ten percent less than the production roadster’s. In engineering terms, the lightweight 190 SL differed only slightly from the production version. The modifications included a bit of fine-tuning of the engine, lowering of the bodywork and fitting of sports shock absorbers and modified springs.

Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow W 125 (1937)
By April 26, 2012 Read More →

Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow W 125 (1937)

After the successful W 25 Grand Prix racing car, Mercedes-Benz developed a new car for the 1937 season. The new W 125 racing car had an extremely sturdy, tubular oval frame made from special steel, with four cross members. It benefited from tests with production car frames as, for instance, the one used on the 1938 generation of the Mercedes-Benz 230. The wheels were located differently, by double wishbones and coil springs at the front, as on the celebrated, noble 500 K and 540 K models, and by a double-joint De Dion rear axle which ensured constant camber, plus longitudinally installed torsion bar springs and lever-type shock absorbers. Lateral links transferred thrust and brake moments to the chassis.