Classic Sports Cars

Lamborghini Countach LP400 (1974-1977)
By September 18, 2012 Read More →

Lamborghini Countach LP400 (1974-1977)

Lamborghini introduced Countach LP5000 prototype at the Geneva Motor Show in 1971. The car was styled by Marcello Gandini of the Bertone design studio. Marcello Gandini was the same man who had also designed the Lamborghini Miura. The Countach prototype had a striking design. The car’s shape was wide and low, but not very long. One of the Countach’s trademarks were the scissor doors. The front hinged scissor doors were stylish, but there was also a practical reason. The car’s tubular spaceframe chassis meant that the door sills were very high and wide, which made it a bit difficult to get out of the car. And because of the width of the car, the conventional doors would have been impossible to use in a confined space.

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL “Gullwing” (W 198) (1954-1957)
By September 13, 2012 Read More →

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL “Gullwing” (W 198) (1954-1957)

The road version of the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL was unveiled in February 1954 at the International Motor Sports Show in New York. Series production began in Sindelfingen in August 1954 and the price was fixed at 29,000 Marks – a quite enormous sum at the time, especially when you compared the new model alongside the Mercedes-Benz 170 Vb – on sale at 7,900 Marks.

Alpine A110 Berlinette (1963-77)
By July 3, 2012 Read More →

Alpine A110 Berlinette (1963-77)

The Alpine A110 Berlinette was unveiled at the 1962 Paris Motor Show. The car had been developed from the Alpine A108, but was more stylish and more dynamic, with an even lower engine cover, a larger glazed area and the rear lights from the Renault 8.

Mazda MX-5 1st gen. (1989-1998)
By June 25, 2012 Read More →

Mazda MX-5 1st gen. (1989-1998)

Mazda MX-5 is known as Miata in United States and Eunos Roadster in Japan. The history of this compact sports car dates back to the early 1980s, when Mazda’s engineers started to build up a design for a new, lightweight, two-seater sports car. Many different ideas were submitted in the planning phase. Layout proposals included front-wheel drive (FWD), rear-wheel drive (RWD) and even a mid-engine setup. In order to minimize development and production costs, the best approach would have been to replace the body of a compact FWD car with a new sports car body, or perhaps reposition the engine and drivetrain for a mid-engine layout. However, the agile handling and a linear driving feel would be almost impossible to achieve without a RWD layout. For Mazda, this meant an entirely new powertrain would have to be developed, which would require a sizeable investment. In the end, despite the added cost, the engineers agreed that they had no choice but to pursue the ideals of a lightweight sports car.

Porsche 911 2.0 (1964-1969)
By April 18, 2012 Read More →

Porsche 911 2.0 (1964-1969)

By the mid 1950s, Ferry Porsche had decided that completely new model was needed to maintain the technological edge of the Porsche brand. The planning work of the new model started in 1957, after Ferry Porsche had defined the key specifications for successor of the Porsche 356.

Mazda Cosmo Sport 110S (1967-1972)
By January 24, 2012 Read More →

Mazda Cosmo Sport 110S (1967-1972)

The Mazda Cosmo Sport 110S was the world’s first dual-rotor rotary engine powered car. Its first prototype model was unveiled to the public at the Tokyo Motor Show in October 1963. The Mazda Cosmo Sport featured beautiful, futuristic proportions and exceptional driving performance. After the formal announcement of the Mazda Cosmo Sport, the engineers continued to work on quality and durability improvements to produce more refined performance before the production would begin in 1967.