Classic Race Cars

Lancia Stratos rally car
By January 20, 2015 Read More →

Lancia Stratos rally car

Lancia Stratos was a two-seater car with a compact body and mid-engine, rear-wheel drive layout. The length of the car was 3710mm and the width around 1800mm, depending on the type of the rear cover. Wheelbase of the car was 2180mm. Lancia Stratos’ 2.4-litre V6 engine was borrowed from the Ferrari Dino. In the production model the engine produced 192 horsepower.

Sauber-Mercedes C 9 (1987-1990)
By June 4, 2014 Read More →

Sauber-Mercedes C 9 (1987-1990)

The Sauber-Mercedes C 9 racing sports car was the outcome of a longstanding innovation partnership between Mercedes-Benz and the Swiss racing team established by Peter Sauber, a relationship that dated back to 1984. That was the year in which the Stuttgart company and the Zurich-based racing car designer reached an agreement for Mercedes-Benz to supply engines for the Sauber prototype sports cars used in the Group C motor racing series.

Auto Union Silver Arrow Type A (1934)
By September 8, 2013 Read More →

Auto Union Silver Arrow Type A (1934)

Auto Union Type A was the first of the famous Auto Union racing cars from the 1930s. At the time German racing cars were given a silver paint finish, and therefore these cars were also called Silver Arrow.

Bentley 3 Litre (1921-1929)
By June 12, 2013 Read More →

Bentley 3 Litre (1921-1929)

Walter Owen Bentley reckoned racing was the best way to promote the new company and the new car. However, the big and heavy Bentley 3 Litre didn’t suit well in Grand Prix racing. Instead it was perfect for endurance racing due to its strong and reliable engine. Bentley 3 Litre took its first win in the Le Mans 24 Hour race in 1924 driven by John Duff and Frank Clement, who participated as a private team driving their own car. Next year Bentley participated Le Mans with a factory team. In 1927 Bentley factory team drivers Sammy Davis and Dudley Benjafield took the second win for Bentley 3 Litre in Le Mans 24 Hour race.

Renault Type K (1902)
By May 8, 2013 Read More →

Renault Type K (1902)

Built in 1902, the Renault Type K race car was a 3.43 metres long and 1.48 metres wide. It was powered by a 4-cylinder engine with a displacement of 3,770cc. The engine produced around 24 horsepower at 1,100rpm.

Blitzen-Benz (1909)
By April 15, 2013 Read More →

Blitzen-Benz (1909)

Development of the record-breaking Benz 200 hp started in 1909 at Benz & Cie. in Mannheim under the guidance of Victor Hemery. The starting point for the new vehicle was the Benz 150 hp racing car. By enlarging the bore to 185 mm, the displacement of the 15.1-litre engine was increased to a substantial 21.5 litres. The unit produced up to 147 kW (200 hp) at 1600 rpm. The four-cylinder in-line engine consisted of cylinders cast together in pairs, and weighed 407 kg. It had overhead inlet and outlet valves as well as two spark plugs per cylinder. The engine’s power was transferred to the rear axle by a four-speed manual transmission via an idler shaft and chain.

Ford 999 (1902)
By April 10, 2013 Read More →

Ford 999 (1902)

In May, 1902, Henry Ford and Tom Cooper, along with several assistants, began building two race cars. These cars were later named as 999 (painted yellow) and Arrow (painted red). Originally, the two cars could be differentiated by their intake manifolds. The 999 had right-angle bends in the runners, while the bends in the Arrow’s manifold were more gentle and curving, which made this car the faster of the two. However, parts and paint were swapped between the two so often that precisely which car was which became obscured.

BMW 328 Touring Coupe (1939)
By April 4, 2013 Read More →

BMW 328 Touring Coupe (1939)

In 1938 BMW’s rivals had achieved good results in using lightweight, streamlined bodies in small-engined cars in races in the Le Mans and Mille Miglia. Open-top cars had been shown to be less aerodynamically efficient than hardtops, and BMW wasn’t about to argue. In 1938 the decision was taken to build a hardtop racing saloon based on the BMW 328 Roadster.

Ferrari 512 S (1970)
By January 29, 2013 Read More →

Ferrari 512 S (1970)

To challenge the Porsches, mainly 917, in the 1970 World Sportscar Championship, Ferrari created the 512 S race car. The new racer was developed relatively quickly by a team headed by Mauro Forghieri. As the car’s name would suggest, the Ferrari 512 S was powered by an all-alloy, 5-litre V12-engine. With twin overhead camshafts per bank and four valves per cylinder the engine delivered 550 horsepower at 8500 rpm.

Porsche 908 Coupe (1968)
By January 7, 2013 Read More →

Porsche 908 Coupe (1968)

After FIA reduced the engine capacity limit to 3 litres for prototypes in the World Constructors’ Championships at the end of 1967, Porsche designed the 908 sports car to have an even footing with its rivals in the competition for the title. Porsche 908 was the first Porsche sports car to have an engine with the maximum size allowed by the rules. Its new 3-litre engine was tailor-made to the large capacity class for the first time in the long motorsport history of Porsche.