Benz Patent Motor Car (1886)
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Benz Patent Motor Car (1886)

The Benz Patent Motor Car is regarded as the world’s first automobile. It completed its maiden journey in public on Mannheim’s Ringstraße on 3 July 1886. The event represented for designer Carl Benz the fulfilment of his dream to build a motorised road-going vehicle. His design, which included chassis and engine, was a fundamentally new innovation. Just a few weeks later, a second automotive pioneer, Gottlieb Daimler, installed an internal combustion engine in a carriage and in so doing marked the beginning of his dream to motorise all vehicles and appliances with his high-speed engine.

Category: Classic Cars
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Carl Benz’s single-cylinder engine
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Carl Benz’s single-cylinder engine

The Benz Patent Motor Car from 1886 is regarded as the world’s first automobile. The heart of the Benz Patent Motor Car was a single-cylinder, four-stroke engine with a displacement of 0.954 litres. This design already incorporated several of the key features found in most internal combustion engines today, including a crankshaft with counterweights, electric ignition and water cooling. The unit developed a peak output of 0.55 kW at 400/min.

Category: Famous Engines
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Carl Benz
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Carl Benz

Carl Benz was born in Karlsruhe on 25 November 1844. He attended the local grammar school and went on to study under Ferdinand Redtenbacher at the Polytechnic University of Karlsruhe. Upon graduation he embarked on a two-year internship at Maschinenbau-Gesellschaft Karlsruhe, where Benz immersed himself in work in all departments. His first full-time employment was as a draughtsman and designer with a scales manufacturer in Mannheim. In 1868 he moved to the engineering firm of Gebrüder Benckiser – Eisenwerke und Maschinenfabrik, who were involved mainly in building bridges and steam engines.

Victor Hemery
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Victor Hemery

Victor Hemery was born in France on 18 November 1876. He joined Automobiles Darracq as a test driver and mechanic in the early 1900’s. Hemery was also a successful racer in the early days of Grand Prix racing. In 1905 he won the Vanderbilt Cup Race driving Darracq. That same year he set a new land speed record of 176,46 km/h (109.65 mph) on 30 December 1905 at Arles, France driving a Darracq.

Blitzen-Benz (1909)
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Blitzen-Benz (1909)

Development of the record-breaking Benz 200 hp started in 1909 at Benz & Cie. in Mannheim under the guidance of Victor Hemery. The starting point for the new vehicle was the Benz 150 hp racing car. By enlarging the bore to 185 mm, the displacement of the 15.1-litre engine was increased to a substantial 21.5 litres. The unit produced up to 147 kW (200 hp) at 1600 rpm. The four-cylinder in-line engine consisted of cylinders cast together in pairs, and weighed 407 kg. It had overhead inlet and outlet valves as well as two spark plugs per cylinder. The engine’s power was transferred to the rear axle by a four-speed manual transmission via an idler shaft and chain.

Berna Eli “Barney” Oldfield
By April 10, 2013 Read More →

Berna Eli “Barney” Oldfield

Berna Eli “Barney” Oldfield was born on June 3, 1878 in Wauseon, Ohio. He started his racing career with bicycles, and by 1894 he had already won several medals from bike races. Everything changed in 1902 when he met Henry Ford, who had prepared two race cars which were knows as the 999 and the Arrow.