Posts Tagged: BMW history

BMW 328 in motorsport
By October 19, 2011 Read More →

BMW 328 in motorsport

The BMW 328 was the most successful sports car of the 1930’s racing scene. At the time when powerful supercharged “Kompressor” machines ruled the racing roost, the BMW 328 Roadster – weighing just 780 kilograms and developing a modest 80 horsepower in series production form – was a genuine sensation. The success of the BMW 328 lay in the sum of its parts: rigorously applied lightweight design, ideal weight distribution, aerodynamic lines, the perfect engine and a meticulously tuned chassis delivering flawless roadholding. All of which allowed it to underpin a fresh understanding of what a car could be, one which saw the engine’s output teaming up with the optimum interplay of all the car’s component parts – and complemented by maximum efficiency – to achieve success. These qualities enabled the BMW 328 to embody the values that still underpin the BMW brand today: dynamics, aesthetic appeal and a high degree of innovation.

BMW 328 Roadster (1937-1940)
By June 30, 2011 Read More →

BMW 328 Roadster (1937-1940)

Although the BMW 328 was developed on the basis of the BMW 319/1, the car differed significantly in both its exterior appearance and under the skin. The lack of resources for an all-new design meant that the BMW 328 had to do with a modified version of the 50 hp engine from the BMW 326. The 2-litre grey cast iron block was given a new cylinder head (made from an aluminium alloy) with valves arranged in a “V”. Valves were controlled by the side-mounted camshaft using bell cranks on the exhaust side and transverse pushrods. This impressively effective upgrade increased output to 80 hp at 4500 revs per minute.

Category: Classic Cars
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BMW M3’s four-cylinder engine
By May 12, 2011 Read More →

BMW M3’s four-cylinder engine

After the production of the BMW M1 had stopped, the BMW CEO Eberhard Kuenheim commissioned a design for a successor. On one of his regular visits to Motorsport GmbH in Munich’s Preußenstraße he said, “Mr. Rosche, we need a sporty engine for the 3 Series.” Motorsport GmbH with its managing director of technical development Paul Rosche had demonstrated its expertise with the legendary 5 Series saloons driven by M engines as well as developing the Formula 1 turbo engine that powered Brazilian Nelson Piquet to win the World Championship in the Brabham BMW in 1983.

BMW 3 Series (E21) (1975-1983)
By March 28, 2011 Read More →

BMW 3 Series (E21) (1975-1983)

BMW presented the first generation BMW 3 Series in 1975. Although the two-door Sedan displayed distinctive characteristics emphasising its relationship with the BMW 5 Series unveiled three years earlier, the compact and sporting model that eventually made its debut on the market was a totally new car.

Georg “Schorsch” Meier
By March 13, 2011 Read More →

Georg “Schorsch” Meier

Georg “Schorsch” Meier was born on November 9, 1910 in Mühldorf am Inn, Bavaria, Germany. After working as a mechanic, he joined the Bavarian state police in 1931. His driving talents was soon recognized and he took part to endurance races with BMW R4. In 1936, Meier won the German Army championship. Meier was signed to the BMW works team in 1937 and in 1938, in his first season, he became European champion in the 500cc class. In 1939, he was the first non-British to win the Senior Tourist Trophy on the Isle of Man. In the same year, he also raced for the Auto Union team.

BMW 325iX (E30) was BMW’s first all-wheel drive model
By October 21, 2010 Read More →

BMW 325iX (E30) was BMW’s first all-wheel drive model

First BMW all-wheel drive was unveiled in 1985 as a second-generation BMW 3 Series. All-wheel drive was offered exclusively in conjunction with a 2.5-litre six-cylinder in-line petrol engine producing 171 horsepower. The permanent all-wheel drive of the BMW 325iX channelled power to the front and rear wheels at a constant 37 : 63 percent split.