Posts Tagged: Chevrolet history

History of Chevrolet Small Block V8
By August 20, 2011 Read More →

History of Chevrolet Small Block V8

From 1929 and 1955, Chevrolet only offered six-cylinder engines. To address the burgeoning performance market, chief engineer Ed Cole set out to design a Chevrolet V8 that was powerful, lightweight and affordable. His solution was elegantly simple: a compact, efficient 90-degree V8 engine, featuring overhead valves, pushrod valvetrain, and 4.4-inch on-center bore spacing. The Chevrolet Big Block follows the same formula, with the exception of a wider 4.8 inch bore spacing.

Chevrolet Classic Six (1912)
By August 7, 2011 Read More →

Chevrolet Classic Six (1912)

Chevrolet’s first car pulled onto the auto scene like a decked-out debutante. Race-car driver Louis Chevrolet imagined an upscale dream car based on the racing cars he loved. The first Chevy engine was a large, liquid-cooled, 299-cubic-inch, six-cylinder cast-iron block. In fact, it would remain Chevrolet’s biggest engine until the late ’50s. The Series C Classic Six had a T-head configuration, produced 40 horsepower and could go a whopping 65 miles an hour, competing with the high-performance cars of its time.

Chevrolet Suburban 1st gen. (1935-1936)
By May 22, 2011 Read More →

Chevrolet Suburban 1st gen. (1935-1936)

The idea for the Suburban was born out of a need for a heavier-duty, truck-based wagon. Through the early 1930s, most manufacturers offered car-based wagons for professional use. Open models with windows and rear seating were known as depot hacks, and were used to ferry passengers and their cargo around train stations and boat docks. Enclosed models, typically without rear seats, were known as sedan deliveries. Bodywork for these early vehicles often consisted of wood sides and canvas tops; and while they were versatile, their car-based chassis and damage-prone bodies were compromises. Chevrolet began experimenting with an all-steel wagon body mounted on a commercial chassis in the mid-1930s, and the Suburban Carryall was launched in 1935.

Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 (1969)
By April 9, 2011 Read More →

Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 (1969)

When the muscle car war was at its peak in the ’60s, enterprising and racing-minded dealers did everything they could to get more powerful cars from the factory. Some Chevrolet dealers discovered that the company’s special order system known as COPO – the acronym for Central Office Production Order – could be used for higher-performance powertrains. It was intended for dealers to place custom orders for things like special paint packages for fleet vehicles, not building factory hot rods. Nevertheless, Camaro-hungry dealers used the system to request larger, 427-cubic-inch engines and other equipment that wasn’t available in regular-production models.

Chevrolet Camaro 2nd gen. (1970-1981)
By February 18, 2011 Read More →

Chevrolet Camaro 2nd gen. (1970-1981)

The second generation Camaro was introduced to the public in the spring of 1970 and stayed in production for 12 years. With styling inspired by Ferrari, the second-generation Camaro was also bigger and heavier than its predecessor. The second generation Camaro was not available as a convertible. It still used a unibody structure with a front subframe, leaf springs in the back and A-arms up front for suspension.

Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 (1990-1995)
By November 9, 2010 Read More →

Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 (1990-1995)

The Corvette ZR-1 was more than merely a more powerful Corvette – it was a complete performance package that included wider rear bodywork to accommodate humongous rear tires and a unique, convex rear fascia with rectangular taillamps that made the car recognizable at a glance.