Posts Tagged: Ferrari history

Ferrari 156 F1 (1961-1962)
By May 26, 2015 Read More →

Ferrari 156 F1 (1961-1962)

Designed by Ferrari’s new designer, Carlo Chiti, the Ferrari 156 F1 had a tubular spaceframe chassis that proved serviceable but could not match the designs of Lotus or BRM. Visually, the car was beautiful, simple and remarkable at the same time. At the front it featured the famous sharknose, named after its distinctive two-fold air inlet.

Ferrari 512 S (1970)
By January 29, 2013 Read More →

Ferrari 512 S (1970)

To challenge the Porsches, mainly 917, in the 1970 World Sportscar Championship, Ferrari created the 512 S race car. The new racer was developed relatively quickly by a team headed by Mauro Forghieri. As the car’s name would suggest, the Ferrari 512 S was powered by an all-alloy, 5-litre V12-engine. With twin overhead camshafts per bank and four valves per cylinder the engine delivered 550 horsepower at 8500 rpm.

Ferrari 308 GTB (1975-80)
By October 13, 2012 Read More →

Ferrari 308 GTB (1975-80)

Ferrari 308 GTB was unveiled at the 1975 Paris Salon. This long awaited replacement for the Dino 246 GT model had a Pininfarina designed body with a pronounced wedge profile. Below a slim full width satin black front bumper was a rectangular egg-crate aluminium radiator grille. Numerous key design elements of the Dino 246 GT carried through into the new model. These included the scalloped door intakes, twin circular rear light assemblies, and the vertical concave rear screen bounded by buttressed sail panels. Ferrari 308 GTB’s shape was a modernisation of that of the Dino, with enough traces of its predecessor to provide a thread of continuity.

Category: Classic Cars
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Ferrari 288 GTO’s twinturbo V8
By February 10, 2012 Read More →

Ferrari 288 GTO’s twinturbo V8

Ferrari 288 GTO’s mid mounted engine was a 90 degree V8 unit fitted longitudinally, with the forward end so close to the cabin bulkhead to optimise weight distribution, that a service hatch was provided in the bulkhead for maintenance. This was the first longitudinally mounted V8 engine fitted in a Ferrari production road car, and also the first to be fitted with twin turbochargers. The total cubic capacity was 2855cc, with a 80mm x 71mm bore and stroke, a compression ratio of 7.6:1, and factory type reference F 114 B 000. It had four valves per cylinder, twin overhead camshafts per bank, each with its own toothed drive belt, dry sump lubrication, with twin IHI turbochargers feeding intake air via a pair of Behr intercoolers at 0.8 bar, coupled to a Weber-Marelli IAW combined ignition/fuel injection system, to provide a claimed power output of 400 bhp at 7000rpm.

Ferrari 288 GTO (1984-1986)
By December 17, 2011 Read More →

Ferrari 288 GTO (1984-1986)

The Ferrari 288 GTO was introduced at the 1984 Geneva Motor Show. The official model designation was solely Ferrari GTO, although most people refer to it as the Ferrari 288 GTO to differentiate it from the legendary 250 GTO from the early sixties, which is often referred to as the GTO. The 288 appellation refers to the total cubic capacity of the engine and number of cylinders, 2.8 litres with 8 cylinders. The GTO captured the buyer’s imagination, although visually it was nothing startlingly different from the mainstream Ferrari eight cylinder models of the period, looking like a 308 that had been on a course of steroids, with more bulbous wheel arches, a lower stance and bigger spoilers. However, the revisions gave it a more aggressive appearance, and under the skin there was muscle enough to pack a powerful punch, complimenting the brawny exterior.

Giuseppe “Nino” Farina – Racing Driver
By June 26, 2011 Read More →

Giuseppe “Nino” Farina – Racing Driver

Giuseppe Antonia “Nino” Farina was born in Turin October 30, 1906. Nino was a nephew of Pinin Farina, who founded the coachbuilding firm Pininfarina and his father Giovanni had established Stabilimente Farina, a bodywork shop.

Ferrari Testarossa (1984-1991)
By June 4, 2011 Read More →

Ferrari Testarossa (1984-1991)

In the Paris Motor Show in October 1984, Ferrari introduced the Ferrari Testarossa. The Pininfarina designed replacement for the Boxer series was visually radically different from its predecessor, although it still featured a mid mounted flat twelve engine. The sharp nosed wedge profile was replaced by a much softer rounded front end. The front wings flowed into one of the models most distinctive styling features, the deeply straked door panels that grew in width towards their trailing edge, before blending into very wide rear wings. At the rear, there weren’t anymore the paired circular tail light arrangement, which had been a styling feature for over a decade. But instead there were full width horizontally slatted satin black louvre hiding rectangular combination light units.