Posts Tagged: Opel history

Opel Kadett B (1965-1973)
By July 16, 2015 Read More →

Opel Kadett B (1965-1973)

Opel Kadett B replaced its successful predecessor, the Opel Kadett A, in 1965. The successor to the first post-war Kadett was 18 centimeters longer, exceeding four meters in length and was available in three body versions right from market launch: as a two or four-door sedan, of course again as a CarAvan station wagon and as a chic coupé.

Opel Vectra A (1988-1995)
By May 28, 2015 Read More →

Opel Vectra A (1988-1995)

Opel Vectra arrived in 1988 to replace the successful Ascona, which was introduced in 1970 and had evolved through three model generations. Everything about Vectra was new. Only Ascona’s front-wheel drive layout and size was carried over, while space was dramatically increased.

Vauxhall Astra GTE mk1 (1983-84)
By May 27, 2015 Read More →

Vauxhall Astra GTE mk1 (1983-84)

The Vauxhall Astra GTE mk1 marked Vauxhall’s first foray in to the relatively new ‘hot hatch’ segment, which had been dominated by the Golf GTI since the late Seventies. Based on the 1980 Astra Mk1, Vauxhall Astra GTE was powered by fuel injected, naturally aspirated 1.8-litre four-cylinder engine producing 115 bhp.

Opel Calibra (1989-1997)
By March 31, 2015 Read More →

Opel Calibra (1989-1997)

Opel Calibra premiered at the Frankfurt Motor Show (IAA) in 1989. Opel Calibra united exciting design with optimized aerodynamics and uncompromised everyday practicality. The wide-opening tailgate gave easy access to a versatile, 980-liter luggage compartment.

Opel Patent Motor Car (1899-1901)
By April 29, 2013 Read More →

Opel Patent Motor Car (1899-1901)

Like all cars built at the dawn of the automobile age, the Opel Patent Motor Car followed traditional carriage design principles and had a body without an integral roof. It was based on Lutzmann’s previously built Arrow models, yet also boasted several innovations. Opel redesigned the chain-controlled steering and designed a deeper chassis frame with strong longitudinal cross members to increase stability and lower the center of gravity of the 520 kg car.

Adam Opel
By April 27, 2013 Read More →

Adam Opel

Adam Opel He began his career as a locksmith apprenticeship but became fascinated by sewing machines during his travels across Europe. While in Paris in 1859, Opel went to work for F. Journaux & Leblond, a maker of sewing machines. In March 1862, he moved to another manufacturer, Heuguenin Reimann, to broaden his understanding.

Opel Rallye Kadett (1966-1973)
By November 23, 2011 Read More →

Opel Rallye Kadett (1966-1973)

The Opel Rallye Kadett was introduced as the sportiest version of the lineup. The Opel Rallye Kadett came to the market with 1.1-litre SR engine with twin carburetors. The car a sporty interior and a distinctive racy design with matte black bonnet and side and rear strips.

Opel Ascona A rally car (1974)
By March 17, 2011 Read More →

Opel Ascona A rally car (1974)

Opel illustrated the sporty potential of the Ascona by presenting the Ascona 1.9 S and the Ascona SR models in spring 1971. The SR version came with an 80 hp 1.6-liter S engine or a 90 hp 1.9-liter unit. Opel Ascona A succeeded also on a rally track when in 1974 Walter Röhrl and Jochen Berger lined up at the start of the European Rally Championship with a two-door sedan. The Ascona of the Opel Euro Dealers Team had a four-cylinder engine re-bored to 2-liter displacement and featured an aluminum cross flow cylinder head that produced 200 hp at 6700 rpm.

Opel Manta A (1970-1975)
By October 4, 2010 Read More →

Opel Manta A (1970-1975)

Modeled on the pony cars that were popular in the US at the time, the sporty Opel Manta was positioned as a vehicle that met a new demand – somewhere between a conventional coupé and a traditional sedan. Like the pony cars, the Manta was stylish yet suitable for everyday family use.

Category: Classic Cars
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Opel Ascona A (1970-1975)
By September 28, 2010 Read More →

Opel Ascona A (1970-1975)

The Opel Ascona A debuted at the Turin Salon in 1970. It was positioned between the Kadett and the Rekord, targeting a growing customer segment. By March 1975, some 691,438 units of the Ascona A were built.