Posts Tagged: Volvo history

Volvo 740 (1984-1992)
By August 6, 2015 Read More →

Volvo 740 (1984-1992)

Volvo 740 was the 4-cylinder alternative to the Volvo 760. The exterior design was the same. Volvo 740 was a bit more common, not quite as luxurious as the Volvo 760. Over the years, the Volvo 740 was powered by a range of different engines, mostly 4-cylinder in-line units with or without turbochargers, and there were also 6-cylinder diesel variants.

Volvo ÖV4 (1927-1929)
By September 23, 2013 Read More →

Volvo ÖV4 (1927-1929)

The first series-manufactured Volvo ÖV4 left the factory on Hisingen in Gothenburg on April 14th, 1927. The Volvo ÖV4 was based on an American design and had a powerful chassis and live axles with long leaf springs at the front and rear. The four-cylinder 2-litre engine developed 28 hp at 2000 rpm. Car had a 3-speed transmission.

Category: Classic Cars
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Volvo 480 ES (1985-1995)
By December 20, 2012 Read More →

Volvo 480 ES (1985-1995)

Volvo 480 was the first Volvo with the front-wheel drive. Volvo 480 ES made its debut at the Geneva Motorshow in 1986. Not only was the new car cool to look at, it was also a great roadcar. The dynamic properties of the 480 well matched its sporty looks, in spite of a modest 109 hp power output. The engine was a 1.7-litre SOHC Renault unit with electronic fuel-injection.

Volvo 760 (1982-1990)
By February 5, 2012 Read More →

Volvo 760 (1982-1990)

The Volvo 760 became a turning point for Volvo Car Corporation, product wise and financially, and formed the basis for the continuation of the company. But it was an investment of gigantic proportions, SEK 3.5 billion. The whole idea behind it was that the Volvo 760 and all future derivatives were to keep up the sales during the rest of the 1980s and the beginning of the 1990s

History of Volvo’s 6-cylinders
By December 29, 2010 Read More →

History of Volvo’s 6-cylinders

In the spring of 1929, the DB engine saw the light of day fitted to the equally new Volvo PV651, a car both larger and more comfortable than the ÖV and PV4 models. The 6 indicated the number of cylinders, 5 the number of seats and 1 stood for the first version of the new series. The DB engine was a conventional piece of machinery; all cast iron with side valves – the valves standing on the side in the block rather than being located in the cylinder head – and with a capacity of 3010 cc. With a 55 hp power output it easily brought the car past the 100 kph mark. An unusual and slightly extravagant detail was the heavy seven-bearing crankshaft which was both statically and dynamically balanced. Good fuel economy in those days meant anything less than 20 litres per 100 km, and the new six was considered to be very economical indeed and also proved very reliable and long-lasting. Those two properties were to characterise all D and E engine versions over the years.

Category: Famous Engines
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Volvo PV36 Carioca (1935-1938)
By March 16, 2010 Read More →

Volvo PV36 Carioca (1935-1938)

The Volvo PV36 which arrived in the spring of 1935 was one man’s work and that man was Ivan Örnberg, a headstrong and versatile engineer who came to Volvo in 1931 from the Hupp Motor Co in Detroit, makers of Hupmobile. Without the interference of either Assar Gabrielsson or Gustaf Larson, Örnberg ran the PV36 project from start to finish.